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Mon, Jun. 19th, 2006, 05:05 pm

Say whats in my chest... in my cramped lower abdomen... in my thighs and rising through my neck. Say whats true what resonates- and if words dont suffice move- paint- scream- fuck- cry.

Tue, May. 23rd, 2006, 03:15 pm
wrong

If someone has wronged you... if you have a list of grievences... if since being wronged you have been able to see a side of her person you never imained existing then why would you not be able to stop loving that girl? If I could only stop loving her I could continue a friendship with her. But why would I be friends with her now. Today she told me that she would move up to Seattle for me... as if that were the issue!!!! No- fuck no she wont. And she'll stop talking to me as if we were meant for eachother as well. She cheated on me, left me, never appologized or said she wanted me back until that relationship dissolved... and then- magically she's on my doorstep with a sincere apology, a ticket to visit her and a plan for the future. Alright- its fucking bullshit. I can make 10,000 excuses due to her not having courage, being scared and having anxiety issues... just not being strong enough in herself to confront issues ahead of her. But fuck ____ Why would I still be willing to date you knowing that you did not have the personal strength to be up front wiht me. That you would rather decieve than tell a painful truth, that you would rather hurt and ignore than face potential rejection or anger... that you would rather hint tease and play mind fucking games then ever just put yourself on the line. Why would I do that to myself??? Becasue I love you? God knows why I do but I do... and if I could cut it out of myself I would frappe it in a blender. We're not going to be friends until I can deal with that emotion... until I can see you and talk to you without having to lie to myself to bear the pain. When its no longer a struggle for me... maybe not till I've found contentment elsewhere and sated the burn. But in the words of a friend "sometimes you just need time". Right now, I need time. And right now seeing you is helping only you- because I will put on a pleasant face... I will get lost under your arms in our hello hug... I will laugh and joke and talk to about anything under the sun. But it will be a lie. Not that I wont be able to force away the pain temporarily and enjoy your presence, but deep down I'll know that I still love you and that fact, that with the knowledge that you encouraged my vulnerability and then shredded it... that will make it a lie. And my growth, my strenth as a human and as a woman lies solidly in my ability to be honest with myself.

Fri, May. 12th, 2006, 01:37 pm

Kimberly Warren
Extra Credit
Social Work 200
Responses



1. A Task group is different than a treatment group because instead of working on helping to solve individual group members problems the group meets collectively to address an issue. They collaborate to solve problems, develop ideas, formulate plans and a cheive collective goals. While group members may indirectly benefit from this group it has a greater purpose and goals beyond the individuals personal problems. Some examples of the kinds of groups are treatment conferences, administrative groups, delegate councils, committees, social action groups and teams. A more specific example of a team would be the QTIIG (Queer Women and Trans Individuals Interest Group) which consists of more than two people collaboratively and interdependently working together to plan transgender awareness week for the UW campus. The group worked together collaborating their ideas, skills and contacts to raise money, plan events, encourage involvement and implement the process.

A treatment group alternatively helps the individual members to solve personal problems. This can occur in the form of changing unwanted behaviors, coping with stress, improving their quality of life and in many other ways. The main difference here is that the focus is internal and does not necessarily extend to outside issues. Some examples include Support groups, Educational groups, Growth groups, Socialization groups and Therapy. A more specific example of a growth group would be a group of gender dysphoric meeting to explore the idea of transitioning. This group would be aimed at expanding self-awareness, increasing potential and maximizing health and wellbeing of the group members.


2. Social Insurance is a social welfare policy that is based on the idea that if you put in you are entitled to take out. Old age, Survivors, Disability and health Insurance are all examples of social insurance because you contribute financially over time to the Insurance policy and at such a time as you need it you are entitled to financial help. Unemployment insurance, workers compensation and Medicare are also social insurance policies. Retirement benefits are a specific example of Social Security Social insurance. This allows workers, who have paid taxes through employment up to age 65 to then be eligible for benefits.
Public Assistance policies are not based upon entitlement or what you have contributed as Social Insurance is. Instead it is based upon the need of the recipient. The funding is derived from general tax revenues. TANF or Temporary Assistance to Needy Families is an example of Public Assistance. This program does not give funding directly to poor people but to states and the block grants are then distributed under the discression of the state. Much of the money is used in food stamps, child care, child protection programs, school meals and nutritional programs for low income pregnant women and children. To receive these benefits individuals do not have to contribute but simply fulfill the states eligibility requirements. There are however severe caps on how much an individual can receive and how long they can receive it for.

3. Culture of Poverty is a term that describes the mindset of people who “learn to live in poverty, accept its values and low expectations, and fail to see any way out of it. It, according to the text book, puts blame on individuals and their families. I however disagree with the book and with those who say recognizing a culture of poverty implies that these individuals could simply pull themselves out of it if they made the choice.
I certainly believe that Political and Economic factors play a large role as to why people are in poverty but you can not discount the cultural aspect simply because it is possible to twist it into a negative view of the poor. Children growing up in poverty often grow up within a culture where not much is expected of them. Their childhoods are often spent expending so much energy on survival, on eating, facing abuses, sustaining mockery from peers and so many other trials that children growing up in higher socioeconomic standing may not have to face. These challenges do not facilitate reaching a persons maximum intellectual or developmental potential and often when they reach an age of adulthood we look at them and blame ensues. These challenges are however occasionally scaled by individuals of exemplary strength and motivation as is told in anecdotal examples. Such stories often have an example in them of a person or people who expressed their belief in the child and evoked in them a faith in themselves and a belief that they can achieve greater things than they see around them.
This does not say in any terms that all children are given that opportunity nor that even if taught faith in themselves all individuals can “pull themselves out of poverty”. Instead it is saying that being downtrodden, having few tangible positive role models, being told that you will be nothing, receiving any number of self esteem ravaging input does factor in to the ultimate financial outcome of a persons life. If we discount that we do much more harm than we do good and we dispense of one of the key tools we as not only social workers, teachers and parents but human beings can do for our children. Show them their true value.

Fri, May. 12th, 2006, 01:36 pm

Pro- UNICO; Total:23 Fractions represent comments with multiple concerns Amount of Concern; fractions added together Percentages Total# of people Concerned about specific issue
Home for Wesley Foundation Needed(though not incompatible w/ compromise plan) 11 1/2 1/2 1/2 12.5 54.36 15
Design of UNICO building fits with City and neighborhood design review elements &/or character 2 1/2 1/2 3 13.05 4
Good for business in the U. District 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/3 1.83 7.96 4
Unspecified Reason for Support 2 2 8.7 2
Mixed Use development is beneficial as it increases those living and working in neighborhood 2 1/2 1/2 1/3 3.33 14.49 5
Help the ministry of Temple UMC (?Meaning?) 1/3 0.33 1.44 1

Anti-UNICO; Total: 63
Good for business in the U District 1 1/5 1.2 1.9 2
Allegro as gathering place, cultural center, neighborhood character 2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/3 1/3 1/3 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/5 8.7 13.81 19
Allegro - business specific- light, space & view 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/3 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/5 1/5 1/6 1/6 1/7 4.67 7.41 15
Roots; Gentrification 3 1/2 1/3 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/5 1/5 5.48 8.7 12
Safety of Alley (no mention of Roots) 1 1/2 1/2 1/4 2.25 3.57 4
Mural- proposal ruins mural, Need public art, effort into mural, etc. 1/3 1/4 1/4 1/5 1/5 1/6 1.4 2.22 6
Univ. Temple- destruction of façade, architectural importance 1/2 1/3 1/3 1/3 1/3 1/3 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/5 1/5 1/6 1/6 1/7 4.55 7.22 17
Univ. Temple- historic significance, historic landmark preservation 1 1/2 1/2 1/3 1/3 1/3 1/4 1/5 1/5 3.64 5.78 9
Town and Gown- Architectural Link to University 1/2 1/3 1/3 1/3 1.5 2.38 4
Streetscape- disturbs pattern of spatial intervals along 15th 1 1/3 1/3 1/3 1/4 1/4 1/5 1/7 2.84 4.52 8
Bulk and Scale out of proportion- too much mass, not enough setbacks, etc. 2 1/2 1/3 1/3 1/3 1/3 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/5 1/6 1/6 1/7 6 9.52 17
University bears responsibility- anchor tenant, advanced neighborhood plan, etc. 1 1/2 1/3 1/4 2.08 3.3 4
Need more open space 2 1/3 1/3 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/5 1/6 1/6 1/7 4.09 6.49 11
Parking 1 1/3 1/3 1/4 1/6 1/7 2.22 3.53 6
Incompatibility of Retail on 15th 1/6 0.17 0.27 1
Other historical Structures (building housing La Paz and Magnus Books, etc) 1/3 1/4 1/5 1/7 0.92 1.46 4
Not enough consideration of community input and Design Review Board to be currently acceptable 2 1/2 1/3 1/4 3.8 6.03 5
La Paz Lighting 1/3 1/3 1/4 1/4 1.16 1.85 4
Unspecified Reason to oppose 3 3 4.76 3
Magnus Books Business 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/3 1.08 1.71 4
Will cast playground into shade 1/2 1/4 1/6 0.92 1.46 3
Ok Idea but wrong location 1 1/3 1.33 2.11 2
Total 63 100
Other
Design of UNICO fits into neighborhood design review elements and/or character 1 1 20 1
Home for Wesley Foundation 1/2 0.5 10 1
Allegro as gathering place, cultural center, neighborhood character 1/2 0.5 10 1
Roots; Gentrification 1/2 0.5 10 1
Bulk and Scale out of proportion- too much mass, not enough setbacks, etc. 1 1 20 1
La Paz Lighting 1 1 20 1
Mixed Use development is beneficial as it increases those living and working in the neighborhood 1/2 0.5 10 1
Total 5 100

Wed, Mar. 29th, 2006, 11:00 am

WOMEN STUDIES 310 - WOMEN AND THE LAW

Spring 2006 - COURSE SYLLABUS



Course Instructor: Patricia Novotny
Office: Padelford B110S
Office Hours: Thursday 11:30-12:30 and By Appointment
Phone Number: 206-525-0711 (PLEASE USE THIS PHONE # OR EMAIL)
e-mail: novotny@u.washington.edu
website: http://faculty.washington.edu/novotny/

Course Description:

This course will examine the interplay between women and the United States legal system with particular attention to: historical antecedents, cultural location, intersection of gender with race, class, and sexuality. Students should complete the course with:
(1) some understanding of how the U.S. legal system orders social and economic relations;
(2) an acquaintance with the principal laws and legal doctrines relevant to women’s lives (e.g., Constitution, Civil Rights Act, rape law, reproductive rights, etc.);
(3) a critical awareness of the law’s historical and current gender partiality;
(4) an appreciation for the intersection between gender, race, economic class and sexual orientation;
(5) an acquaintance with the historical women’s movement and some important feminist theorists; and
(6) an ongoing curiosity about the law and its impact on women’s lives in the United States and internationally.

Required Texts: Bartlett, Gender and Law (Little Brown & Co.), 3d Ed. 2002
(available at Univ. Bookstore)
YOU MUST HAVE THE THIRD EDITION
OTHER ASSIGNMENTS BY EMAIL/WEBSITE

Course Requirements:

• Assigned Reading
• Two Hours of Written Examination
• Two Response Papers (Assigned & Graded by Teaching Assistant)
• One 5-7 Page Paper
• Class Participation

E-Mail Communication: In general, I will provide handouts to you via email or via a website. In the schedule, these assignments will be denoted “web.”

Notes on Course Requirements:

You are responsible for keeping apprised of events as they unfold throughout the quarter. If you miss class, you are responsible for contacting a classmate or me or the TA to ascertain what you may have missed (e.g., announcements, handouts, etc.).

The exams will be distributed and taken in class. They will require essay-type written answers and completion of a multiple choice section, which will have as one goal verification that class assignments are being read. No books or notes may be used.

You will choose a paper topic from a list of topics I provide. You may not write on another topic without submitting a written proposal, which I then approve. The paper must address a legal aspect of the topic, meaning, for example, that you cannot just write about rape as a problem generally. You must analyze the topic as a problem involving women and the law. (And, by analysis, I mean you must do more than describe the problem; you must grapple with it.) Students are encouraged to write precisely and to emphasize clarity as well as substance. You will be graded not only on the research performed and the quality of your analysis, but on the quality of your expression. I strongly urge you to begin this project early and to allow yourself time for revision and editing. Unexcused late papers will be penalized.

Class attendance is strongly recommended. Be warned that it is extremely difficult to do well in this course without attending class.

Readings will be assigned from the casebook, perhaps supplemented by handouts or internet-based materials. All the assigned reading is necessary to an understanding of the topics we will discuss, although we will not be able to discuss everything you read.

Grades: Grades are determined on the prevailing 4.0 scale. Each exam will count for 25% of your grade; the response papers combined will count for 25%; and the paper will count for 25%. For each, you will receive a raw score on a scale of 0-100; the decile grade will be determined at the completion of all class work based on these raw scores.

Add Policy: In the event the class is filled to capacity, the following policy shall apply. Interested students should attend class during the first week, signing in on a form provided. On the last class of the week, we will determine the status of the class size. If necessary and appropriate, I will at that time and in special cases give entry codes for overloading.


Schedule of Events; THIS SCHEDULE IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE


WEEK 1 Historical Background: Formal Equality Becker, 2-6; 12-16 (through Basch); 30-42; 44-49; 51-58; 95-97 (Stanton); 117-119; 121-125; 432-437 (Saff) & Hussey (web)
WEEK 2 Formal Equality; Constitutional Equality (EPC); Civil Rights Act (Title VII) 129-134; Romer v. Evans (web); 140-147; 167-174; 181-186; 212-227
April 4 Distribute Paper Topics
April 11 PAPER TOPIC DUE
Response Paper One Assigned identify chosen topic (by email)
WEEK 3 Substantive Equality (Affirmative Action; Pregnancy) 265-284; 236-245; 320-342;
WEEK 4 Substantive Equality (School Athletics Education) 374-382; 410-432; NYT Article: “Benched” (web); 382-409
April 18 Response Paper One Due in Class
WEEK 5 Nonsubordination (Sexual Orientation) 731(E)-757; 771-781
APRIL 27 EXAMINATION IN CLASS
WEEK 6 Nonsubordination (Sexual Harassment; Pornography) 540-568; 579-581; 597-605; 700-724
WEEK 7 Rape 936-949; 955-962; 984-988; Revised Code of Washington; State v. Young (web)
WEEK 8 Reproduction (Abortion; Birth Control) 1031-1079; 1092-1107;
May 2 Response Paper Two Assigned
WEEK 9 Reproduction (Drugs; Technology) 1117-1137; 1138-1158; State v. Dunn (web)
May 9 Response Paper Two Due in Class IN CLASS
WEEK 10 Poverty; Families 1161-1187; 432-463; 464-496; 508-532
May 25 PAPER DUE – TURN IN AT CLASS
June 7 EXAMINATION AT 10:30 AM IN CLASS

Wed, Mar. 29th, 2006, 11:00 am

LAWMAKING, INTERPRETATION, AND ENFORCEMENT


THREE COEQUAL BRANCHES OF GOVERNMENT:

LEGISLATIVE
•Legislatures make law by passing statutes and ordinances.
•Congress, State Legislatures, Municipal And County Councils

JUDICIARY
•Courts interpret the law (statutes, ordinances, and constitutions) through analysis of text (statutory interpretation or statutory construction) and through application of precedent (“stare decisis”).
•Courts also can make law through their “common law” authority.
•State and Federal Courts
•Trial and Appellate Courts

EXECUTIVE
•Executives enforce the laws, often through regulations.
•President, Governor, Mayor (and their executive agencies)

FEDERAL SYSTEM } Each with three branches.
} Each with lawmaking authority.
STATE SYSTEMS } Each with laws and a constitution.

Note that not all courts have the same power to
hear all cases. Their authority depends upon
JURISDICTION. (E.g., WA court cannot rule on
case involving an automobile accident in Idaho.)

State and federal courts have sometimes separate
and sometimes overlapping jurisdiction.

LAW = Constitution, Statutes/Ordinances, Cases
(Precedent), Regulations.

Substance: What happened.
Procedure: How we figure out what happened.

Dispute = something happened that allegedly violates the civil law.

Complaint = the pleading filed by injured party to start a lawsuit against the party alleged to have caused the injury.

Discovery = the pre-trial process when each side asks for and reveals information of possible relevance to the case.

Trial = the parties submit their versions of events (evidence) and their arguments about the law to a judge and/or jury.

Fact-finder: judge or jury decides what facts are true.

Jury Instructions: judge instructs the jury about the law, which the jurors apply to the facts as they believe them to have occurred. (Or, if no jury, the judge applies the law to the facts s/he has found to have occurred.)

Judgment: one party or another wins the trial in whole or in part.

Appeal: a party that loses may seek review of the case by an appellate court. The appellate court DOES NOT hear the evidence and decide the facts all over again, but will generally accept the facts as found by the jury or trial judge. The appellate court looks for errors of law (e.g., was the evidence properly admitted or excluded? Did the jury instruction correctly define the legal standard that applies? Did the jury limit its consideration to the evidence, or did a juror bring in extraneous matter?).

Appellate court will affirm or reverse the trial court’s decision. If the appellate court’s opinion explaining this result helps our understanding of the law, case is published = precedent.

Saff v. Saff, 402 N.Y.S.2d 690 (App. Div. 1978), appeal dismissed, 415 N.Y.S.2d 829 (NY 1979)

Tue, Feb. 21st, 2006, 11:41 pm
avian

What is shown by the nature of avian influenza is that the damage is rarely if ever localized. When another tiny unknown village identifies the virus in a dead bird or dying child it is not merely a horror for the family and town, but potentially for the entire world. What effects those eating in the open air markets in Thailand could extend to Seattle and effect loved ones within very little time. This indicates a twofold necessity, first we must put a unified and international effort into battling bird flu at any location and whenever it strikes and implement measures to prevent the spreading of the virus, and secondly we must prepare in every nation and locality for the pandemic that could and may come.

The potential economic effects of bird flu alone have been likened to a short term repetition of the great depression. Furthermore due to our very high population and the density of the world we have health risks for humans much greater than those of past generations, who regardless lost over 50 million to a strain of influenza. Current efforts to fight avian influenza include the stockpiling of drugs, the production of a vaccine, surveying birds and the spread of the disease worldwide, and poultry import bans. These efforts are all necessary and useful but further analysis and planning is imperative.

The stockpiling of drugs for avian influenza would in essence need to be a worldwide effort in order to have a long term and sustainable effect. Since currently there is only one company with the rights to produce Tamiflu this is not an economical option for many countries without the extensive resources of the US. Therefore while this effort is commendable it is further necessary to extend the right to produce antiviral drugs that are affective against avian influenza to research facilities and competing companies. In this way the production of such drugs can be widespread and the costs will be ultimately lowered significantly, a necessity for poorer countries. Another preparatory option would be to implement a procedure for counties with resources to provide drugs and possibly vaccines to other countries which would ultimately serve their personal interests, to avoid a pandemic which would affect the world.
In Asia where avian influenza has been most prominent urbanization is expected to have the highest rate in the world over the next 25 years (FESS 05). During the same amount of time the urban population is expected to double (FESS 05). This direction of “growth” could have truly devastating effects on the worlds likelihood of being affected by pandemics. Further solutions would need to address the rising populations which stem the need to clear forests in the region. The work of Amartya Sen has shown that the education of women and their presence in the workplace plays a leading role in stabilizing birthrates (1999). Such efforts would find an essential place in the work to prevent pandemics and the spread of such deadly viruses.

One relatively unexplored option is that of halting deforestation to broaden the gap between domestic and wild birds. Deforestation has caused much integration of migratory birds, who’s routes are fixed, into farming scenes and into urban areas increasing the mix of migratory birds with humans and with domestic poultry. While damage has already been done an effort to terminate any further damage would be a step towards harmony with the environment and with security from this and further possible pandemics.

While vaccine research is being conducted and they have been successful in creating a vaccine to prevent avian influenza sufficient testing has not been conducted at this point for widespread implementation. To create a solution via vaccine it is necessary to



Works Cited
(FESS) “Environmental Factors Affecting the Spread of Bird Flu” Foundation for Environmental Security and Sustainability, September 2005.
http://www.fess-global.org/issuebriefs/environmental_factors_affecting_the_spread_of_bird_flu.pdf

Sen, Amartya “Development as Freedom” Oxford, Oxford University Press. 1999

Wed, Feb. 15th, 2006, 01:49 am

YOUR PLANS: What excites you about CEP? How does CEP fit into your educational plans, personal values, and/or ambitions? What will you bring to the CEP program and how may the community benefit from your presence? Feel free to include possible double majors, minors, areas of academic focus, internships, field experiences, and/or study abroad plans.

YOUR FUTURE: Describe some of your current plans for the future. How will the academic program of CEP, i.e. core seminars, service activities, and governance, help enable you to achieve these goals? This is a vision essay. Please communicate to us your vision for yourself in the world.


My Vision


A well known fact among astrologers is that Gemini’s are not gifted at sticking to decisions. My June 4 birthday combined with my history as a college student has led me to be far less suspicious of divination. I began college as a dedicated communication student and soon moved on to psychology. By the time I had rejected Comparative Ethnic Studies, Political Science, and Philosophy I knew little more about my education path than I had at the onset of my freshman year. I knew I wanted to travel, to understand the world, and to speak as many languages as possible. I also wanted to make a contribution, a need which has ultimately defined my vision for myself in the world.
What I did gain through my experience with various fields was that education has value disconnected entirely from the degree it leaves you with. The process of learning is a process of growth that cannot be measured by grades or by transcripts. I believe that CEP understands that process on a level I have not previously seen in a major and I am excited at the opportunity to enter a community with such values. Yet it is more than the intrinsic value of education that draws me to the CEP program.
In an effort to determine the most skillful and effective way to make a contribution I weighed many options. Social work was for no insignificant period of my life a primary goal. As I heard continual examples of the bitter struggles individuals face from day to day I saw an opportunity to contribute on an individual level. Yet, during a seventeen month stint working with the Department of Children and Family Services as a Human Service Assistant I saw another side of social work. Societal and Governmental influences both financial and legal play an incalculable role in limiting the effectiveness of social work. Thus I decided upon a vocation in law as a means in which I could achieve the education and system knowledge to facilitate change and have a true influence.
Despite my current interest in the law I do not wish to loose sight the values I have come to hold. The interconnectivity within a community, within individuals, within life is of paramount interest to me. I believe that CEP understands this interconnectivity and symbiosis between ourselves and our environment, ourselves and our community and of ourselves among all humans. I furthermore believe that the program can contribute greatly to my current awareness and experience with the subject. In addition I am hoping to gain an overview of the techniques and planning processes that can influence such connections in order to broaden my perspective and comprehension.
My objective in life is not to merely contribute at the pinnacle of my educational endeavors, but at each point along the path. CEP will, I believe, give me a unique opportunity to contribute to the educational growth of others while learning from their wisdom and outlook. My interest in law, social welfare and my personal convictions give me a unique perspective on a major where the diversity of interests is vast. I also bring an international view having studied abroad in Spain for a semester and having traveled to ten countries within the European Union as well as several other regions of the world.
I have a specific interest in Latin American Countries which rises out of a fascination with Latin American literature and the Spanish language. Though Washington State University has awarded me a minor in Spanish, the University of Washington does not honor it and I will be attempting to complete a Spanish Major along with my degree in Community, Environment and Planning. Such a degree will hopefully expand my opportunities within the United States and potentially into an international field as I progress in life.
It is difficult for me to constrict my life goals into a singular vision. I have a desire to spend my immediately post college years traveling and as a Peace Corps volunteer. At the culmination of my time abroad I hope to be admitted to law school and obtain the education I see as mandatory for my future. Yet what will happen post law school is entirely uncertain. Again I return to my initial goal of making a contribution, and with that as an anchor I hope to find a career that is fulfilling as well as beneficial.
I have been inspired by many women and men working in unique fields of law. Non profit organizations, NGO’s, community run agencies, adoption law, and immigration all strike particular chords of interest. My vision lies anywhere within the scope of working towards equality of marriage on a national scale and working with a rape crisis center assisting the organization and each individual in their efforts for justice. In any of such organizations I believe the knowledge, understanding, experience, and perspective I will gain from the CEP program will be beneficial.
Judging from my current experience having attended the 302 core seminar and winter quarter governance CEP is an enriching and highly communicative major. This dynamic of learning within a tightly bound community of intellectual and socially conscious peers with diverse interests is appealing in many senses. Not only do I expect to be challenged to see the world in many different lights, but I expect to challenge others. Only through such dialogue and personal growth can I hope to enable myself to achieve high goals and contribute to my utmost potential.
INDIVIDUAL STUDY PLAN

Kimberly Warren

Majors: Community, Environment and Planning
Spanish



Winter 2006 [CURRENT]
CEP 302 Environmental Response (5) I&S/NW
Explores issues of environmental crisis and societal responses. Readings and reflective analysis from broad selection of authoritative sources to develop grounded perspective in ecological literacy and consciousness. Concurrently, experiential education in challenges and practical responses to building sustainable society through participation in community-based environmental effort. Credit/no credit only. Offered: W.

SPAN 310 Accelerated Intermediate-Advanced Grammar and Lexicon (10) VLPA
Intensive Web-enhanced grammar and writing, combining SPAN 301 and SPAN 302. Designed to develop skills at the intermediate-advanced level in areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: SPAN 203
This is a requirement for the Spanish Major (301-303 series)



Spring 2006

CEP 303 Social Structures and Processes (5) I&S
Investigates use of formal and informal social structures and processes within context of community and environment. Looks culturally at patterns and institutions of social organization and relationships among different sectors. Issues of interrelatedness, citizenship, knowledge, and communication. Participation in local community service organization. Credit/no credit only. Offered: Sp.

SPAN 303 Introduction to Stylistics Through Composition (5) VLPA
Prerequisite: either SPAN 302.
This is a requirement for the Spanish Major.(301-303 series)

SPAN 322 Introduction to Hispanic Cultural Studies (5) I&S/VLPA
Introduces students to elite, mass, and folk cultures of Latin America, Spain, and Latinos in the United States. Sample topics include transculturation, globalization, border culture, and relations between culture, democratization, and human rights. Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or SPAN 314, either of which may be taken concurrently. Offered: Sp.
This is a requirement for the Spanish Major.(321-323 requirement)

SPAN 333 Hispanic Film Studies (3) I&S/VLPA
Introduction to major issues in the study of Hispanic cinema from various national contexts. The relationship of film to other types of narrative, and of film to society, specifically relations between class, gender, ethnicity, and artistic production, as well as between cinema and social change. Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or SPAN 314, either of which may be taken concurrently.
This is a requirement of the Spanish Major (1 of 3 300 electives)





Fall 2006

CEP 460 Planning in Context (5) I&S
Examines theory against backdrop of practice for broad, historical understanding of social, political, environmental planning. Critique from viewpoints, e.g., planning history, ethics, ecofeminism, environmental justice, class and capitalism, planning and global economy. Develop personalized history reflecting individual experience, professional experience, and philosophical heritage of planning profession. Credit/no credit only. Offered: A.

CEP 446 Internship (5, max. 10)
Connects core and individual courses with field work. Group and individual readings develop understanding of how students' internships and field placements constitute particular element of community and environmental planning. Explores how what we do for a living is part of our lives as citizens and public service. Credit/no credit only. Offered: AWSp. Instructor Course Description: Dennis M Ryan
SPAN 321 Introduction to Hispanic Literary Studies (5) VLPA
Acquaints the third-year student with elementary techniques of literary analysis, as applied to examples of narrative, poetry and theater, within the context of the Spanish and Latin American literary traditions. Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or SPAN 314, either of which may be taken concurrently. Offered: A.
Instructor Course Description: Suzanne Helen Petersen
This is a requirement to the Spanish Major.(321-323 requirement)

SPAN 306 Survey of Spanish Literature: 1681 to the Present (3) VLPA
Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or SPAN 314, either of which may be taken concurrently.
This is a requirement of the Spanish Major. (1 of 3 300 level electives)





Winter 2007

CEP 461 Ethics and Identity (5) I&S
Examination of personal, societal, vocational, environmental, planning ethics. Readings and discourse on ethical foundations for public life. Individual and group readings on values, human potential. Develops understanding of ecological context, moral responsibility, self-awareness. Constructs positive, diverse view of humanity, environment regardless of race, gender, ethnicity, beliefs. Credit/no credit only. Offered: W.

SPAN 323 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (5) VLPA
Synchronic and diachronic linguistic analysis of Spanish, including Spanish phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax, and evolution of the language. Prerequisite: either SPAN 301 or SPAN 314, either of which may be taken concurrently. Offered: W.
Instructor Course Description: Ganeshdath D. Basdeo
This is a requirement to the Spanish Major.(321-323 requirement)

SPAN 466 Chicano Literature: Fiction (5) VLPA
Nineteenth- and early twentieth-century fiction, as well as contemporary works, are examined in attempts to trace the development of Chicano fiction in the proper historical trajectory. Prerequisite: either either SPAN 303 or SPAN 316; SPAN 321; one additional 300-level course above SPAN 303.
Instructor Course Description: Lauro H Flores
This is a requirement of the Spanish Major (1 of 3 400 level electives)

SPAN 485 Cultural Studies of Latin America (5) I&S/VLPA
Identity, representation, and transculturation in Latin American popular culture. Topics vary but may include cinema, folk art, and historical, ethnographic, and travel writing. Prerequisite: either SPAN 303 or SPAN 316; SPAN 322; one additional 300-level course above SPAN 303. Offered: jointly with SISLA 485.
This is a requirement of the Spanish Major.(1 of 3 400 level elective)

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Spring 2007
CEP 462 Community and Environment (5) I&S
Capstone quarter merges core seminars, disciplinary courses in major, community field experiences for mastery of personal knowledge and skills. Reflection and synthesis of themes in major; engagement with contemporary issues. Compares theoretical definitions of community and environment with individual philosophies and knowledge within thoughtful, applied context. Credit/no credit only. Offered: Sp.
SPAN 406 Advanced Spanish Grammar (5) VLPA
Problems of Spanish grammar. Differences from English grammar. Techniques for the effective teaching of Spanish. Prerequisite: either SPAN 303 or SPAN 316; SPAN 323. Offered: jointly with SPLING 406.
Instructor Course Description: Alison M. Stevens Farris Furman Anderson
This is a requirement of the Spanish Major. (400-409 elective)

SPAN 305 Survey of Spanish Literature: 1498-1681 (3) VLPA
Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or SPAN 314, either of which may be taken concurrently.
This is a requirement for the Spanish Major (1 of 3 300 level courses).

SPAN 476 Contemporary Latin American Poetry (5) VLPA
Evolution of Latin American poetry, from postmodernism and vanguardism to the most recent poetic expression: Prerequisite: either SPAN 303 or SPAN 316; SPAN 321; one additional 300-level course above SPAN 303
This is a requirement of the Spanish Major. (1 of 3 400 level elective)
Part Two: Please describe a literary work, current issue, piece of music, or work of art that has made a significant impression on you. How has it influenced and impacted your worldview and how you live today?


Arundhati Roy


Arundhati Roy entered my life during a period of cultural draught. My high school had much to be desired when it came to diversity and differing perspectives. Having attended Seventh Day Adventist private schools since preschool I knew very little outside the scope of fundamentalism. Seeped in an institution run by white males, prohibiting any unorthodox behavior or thinking I was unexposed to any variety of world views. Homosexuality was punishable by expulsion and forced exposure to parents, music was confiscated if not pre-approved by the campus deans, and even literature was restricted among students. I was overdue for my initiation into the real world and Arundhati Roy’s book “The God of Small Things” was a meaningful element in my integration.
The book “The God of Small Things” depicted the childhood of two twins growing up in the south Indian state of Kerala. Though it beautifully describes internal horrors they grow up with I was primarily struck by the beauty in their world and in each individual. Throughout my childhood I was bombarded with images of non Christians as riddled in sin, incapable of the moral and ethical fiber that was afforded only by the grace of God. Although I never believed fully in their orthodoxy I admit I was struck every time I found such clear and irrefutable evidence of merit outside of the context of Christianity. Moreover I was struck by the bitter taint of humanity I viewed within the religion.
What began as a fascinating novel left me reeling and with an intense desire to understand humanity. I began with a goal to break down the mystery behind non-Christian religions and soon owned a copy of the Koran, the Baghdad Gita, several Buddhist texts and a score of novels relating to religions and spirituality. What I unfailingly found in each book was an accumulation of wisdom. I found, along with small differentiating details and rare particulars with which I disagreed, that each had merit, value and relevance to my life.
Three years later I am far from finishing my search but have expanded it to encompass much more than religion. I believe each human has positive and negative attributes and no polarized vision of the world can see the beauty inherent in every element of an individual. In the book “The God of Small Things” societal bigotry against the “untouchables” prohibited love and tore the lives of the characters apart. In my own life I have seen such intolerance have lasting results. Regardless of religious orientation, political views, and lifestyles I have seen close mindedness and lack of understanding separate and cause destruction.
What “The God of Small Things” afforded me was an opportunity to turn an introspective eye on my own world view. In understanding myself and the limitations of my youth I become conscious of my bigotries and the judgment interwoven into my perspective. The process of breaking down such bigotries and of fully appreciating equality has not come in the form of an instantaneous epiphany but of a long term reprogramming of my thought processes. Yet I believe true acceptance of the negative and positive elements in every act, every human being, and every institution has been a lesson fully worth the struggle.
YOUR PERSPECTIVE:
Part One: Tell us about an experience, project, extra curricular activity, or personal challenge that you have confronted or participated in. How does/did this influence your path today?


”Tepekkür”

The disk paused for a moment and then turned over in the cassette player, again blasting the same fiery songs we had heard for the last six hours. The truck player pointed to it roughly and resolutely exclaimed “turkey” responding to our nods with a satisfied grin. The Turkish flag dangled over the dashboard, and the stained carpet I sat cross legged upon in the sleeper cabin of the truck added to the ambiance.
“Turkey” was the only lucid English word the driver spoke. I spoke neither Turkish nor French which the driver grudgingly accepted while continuing to call me “Mademoiselle”. I had hoped my years studying Spanish would provide that much needed link, but it was not the case. In desperation my brother pulled out his rusty high school German skills, and though we drove through Germany beyond his recognition of “guten Tag” they fell flat. Regardless of the impasse we had reached I know this; Turkish beer is the best there is, Turkish music is unbeatable, and when it comes to Turkish soccer nothing compares. His name was Ahmed, and his two daughters and wife saw him only every three months as his job was to transport cargo throughout Europe. We relied on our innovation to communicate and when stick figures on the side of a rusty truck taught us all we could know we relied on lessons words couldn’t speak.
My brother and I had spent significant time hitch-hiking in several countries throughout Europe when we met him. The generosity of our various hosts was sometimes overwhelming and more than occasionally embarrassing. Ahmed reached new heights and it was a personal struggle not to reject his hospitality. My prideful spirit resisted his continuous benevolence, yet I found there are lessons beyond the scope of self reliance.
After crudely asking if we were hungry our driver pulled the truck into a petrol station and we unloaded expecting to grab the fruit snacks and packages of nuts out of our backpacks. Instead he pulled down the storage bin of his truck revealing a full kitchen, complete with propane stove which he pulled down and insisted I, as the woman, use as a stool. Feta cheese was sliced into thick portions and loaded along with tomato slices onto pungent bread. Every serving was followed by the insistence of another and our stomachs swelled with appreciation. We were given a thick spicy beer to wash everything down and the pint sized bottles were replaced before reloading into the truck.
Our next meal was provided as well and consisted of eggs scrambled into a tomato paste he mashed upon his make shift cutting board. Bread was dipped into the self spiced mixture to create a filling and surprisingly delicious fare. As night had obscured all he unscrewed reflectors from the bottom of the truck which revealed a tiny light ideal for the illumination of his tiny kitchen. Every element of his habitat, though it was merely an outdated semi-truck, was perfectly honed and orchestrated for efficiency.
That night I slept in his sleeper cabin while my brother and our host struggled to gain comfort in the rigid front seats. I stayed awake for some time unsettled by the selflessness such a stranger had shown two kids hitch-hiking off of the autobahn. By the time we parted I had begun to deeply question my own programmed view of the world where each human takes care of himself first and foremost. Without intending to gain anything but transportation between the Netherlands and Berlin I had experienced enough to devastate a lifetime of comfortable thought.
We stepped down from his truck just outside the town of Magdeburg and finally retrieving our phrasebook from our backpacks made a feeble attempt at pronouncing “tepekkür” to which he laughed, waved, and drove away. Through our brief interaction I realized my inadequacy at accepting others into my life beyond a superficial level. Though I had experienced previously the challenges and rewards of communicating across a language barrier the day I spent with Ahmed gave me a new understanding of the interconnectedness of human beings. Such a small glimpse into his life has lead down a path focused on artfully constructing an existence for myself in harmony with my environment and with the human race.

Tue, Feb. 14th, 2006, 07:58 pm

YOUR PERSPECTIVE:
Part One: Tell us about an experience, project, extra curricular activity, or personal challenge that you have confronted or participated in. How does/did this influence your path today?


Tepekkiir

The disk paused for a moment and then turned over in the cassette player, again blasting the same fiery songs we had heard for the last six hours. The truck player pointed to it roughly and resolutely exclaimed “turkey” responding to our nods with a satisfied grin. The Turkish flag dangled over the dashboard, and the stained carpet I sat cross legged upon in the sleeper cabin of the truck added to the ambiance.
“Turkey” was the only lucid English word the driver spoke. I spoke neither Turkish nor French which the driver grudgingly accepted while continuing to call me “Mademoiselle”. I had hoped my years studying Spanish would provide that much needed link, but it was not the case. In desperation my brother pulled out his rusty high school German skills, and though we drove through Germany beyond his recognition of “guten Tag” they fell flat. Regardless of the impasse we had reached I know this; Turkish beer is the best there is, Turkish music is unbeatable, and when it comes to Turkish soccer nothing compares. His name was Ahmed, and his two daughters and wife saw him only every three months as his job was to transport cargo throughout Europe. We relied on our innovation to communicate and when stick figures on the side of a rusty truck taught us all we could know we relied on lessons words couldn’t speak.
My brother and I had spent significant time hitch-hiking in several countries throughout Europe when we met him. The generosity of our various hosts was sometimes overwhelming and more than occasionally embarrassing. Ahmed reached new heights and it was a personal struggle not to reject his hospitality. My prideful spirit resisted his continuous benevolence, yet I found there are lessons beyond the scope of self reliance.
After crudely asking if we were hungry our driver pulled the truck into a petrol station and we unloaded expecting to grab the fruit snacks and packages of nuts out of our backpacks. Instead he pulled down the storage bin of his truck revealing a full kitchen, complete with propane stove which he pulled down and insisted I, as the woman, use as a stool. Feta cheese was sliced into thick portions and loaded along with tomato slices onto pungent bread. Every serving was followed by the insistence of another and our stomachs swelled with appreciation. We were given a thick spicy beer to wash everything down and the pint sized bottles were replaced before reloading into the truck.
Our next meal was provided as well and consisted of eggs scrambled into a tomato paste he mashed upon his make shift cutting board. Bread was dipped into the self spiced mixture to create a filling and surprisingly delicious fare. As night had obscured all he unscrewed reflectors from the bottom of the truck which revealed a tiny light ideal for the illumination of his tiny kitchen. Every element of his habitat, though it was merely an outdated semi-truck, was perfectly honed and orchestrated for efficiency.
That night I slept in his sleeper cabin while my brother and our host struggled to gain comfort in the rigid front seats. I stayed awake for some time unsettled by the selflessness such a stranger had shown two kids hitch-hiking off of the autobahn. By the time we parted I had begun to deeply question my own programmed view of the world where each human takes care of himself first and foremost. Without intending to gain anything but transportation between the Netherlands and Berlin I had experienced enough to devastate a lifetime of comfortable thought.
We stepped down from his truck just outside the town of Magdeburg and finally retrieving our phrasebook from our backpacks made a feeble attempt at pronouncing “tepekkiir” to which he laughed, waved, and drove away. Through our brief interaction I realized my inadequacy at accepting others into my life beyond a superficial level. Though I had experienced previously the challenges and rewards of communicating across a language barrier the day I spent with Ahmed gave me a new understanding of the interconnectedness of human beings. Such a small glimpse into his life has lead down a path focused on artfully constructing an existence for myself in harmony with my environment and with the human race.
























Part Two: Please describe a literary work, current issue, piece of music, or work of art that has made a significant impression on you. How has it influenced and impacted your worldview and how you live today?



Arundhati Roy

Arundhati Roy entered my life during a period of cultural draught. My high school had much to be desired when it came to diversity or varying perspectives. I had attended Seventh Day Adventist private schools since preschool and knew very little outside the scope of the fundamentalist outlook. Seeped in an institution run by white males, prohibiting any unorthodox behavior or thinking such as homosexuality, and raiding students of music and books not approved by the administration I was overdue for my initiation into the real world. Arundhati Roy’s book “The God of Small Things” was a meaningful element in my integration.
The book “The God of Small Things” depicted the childhood of two twins growing up in the south Indian state of Kerala. Though it beautifully describes internal horrors they grow up with I was primarily struck by the beauty in their world and in each individual. Throughout my childhood I was bombarded with images of non Christians as riddled in sin, incapable of the moral and ethical fiber that was afforded only by the grace of God. Although I never believed fully in their orthodoxy I admit I was struck every time I found such clear and irrefutable evidence of merit outside of the context of Christianity. Moreover I was struck by the bitter taint of humanity I viewed within the religion.
What began as a fascinating novel left me reeling and with an intense desire to understand humanity. I began with a goal to break down the mystery behind non-Christian religions and soon owned a copy of the Koran, the Baghdad Gita, several Buddhist texts and a score of novels relating to religions and spirituality. What I unfailingly found in each book was an accumulation of wisdom. I found, along with small differentiating details and rare particulars with which I disagreed that each had merit, value and relevance to my life.
Three years later I am far from finishing my search but have expanded it to encompass more than religion. I believe each human has positive and negative attributes and no polarized vision of the world can see the beauty inherent in every element of an individual. In the book “The God of Small Things” societal bigotry against the “untouchables” prohibited love and tore the lives of the characters apart. In my own life I have seen such intolerance have lasting results.










YOUR PLANS: What excites you about CEP? How does CEP fit into your educational plans, personal values, and/or ambitions? What will you bring to the CEP program and how may the community benefit from your presence? Feel free to include possible double majors, minors, areas of academic focus, internships, field experiences, and/or study abroad plans.

YOUR FUTURE: Describe some of your current plans for the future. How will the academic program of CEP, i.e. core seminars, service activities, and governance, help enable you to achieve these goals? This is a vision essay. Please communicate to us your vision for yourself in the world.

Vision Essay

I have read in passing many Astrological descriptions of the Gemini, and a recurrent theme is the inability to make decisions since they never stick with the one they originally choose. If ever there were to be a case made for the accuracy of astrology my college career would be an irrefutable support since I am indeed a Gemini. I began as a determined communications major and soon moved on to psychology. By the time I had discarded both political science and philosophy I knew little more than I had at the onset of college. I knew I wanted to travel, to understand the world, and to speak as many languages as possible. I also wanted to make a contribution, a need which has ultimately defined my vision for myself in the world.
What I did gain through my experience with various fields was that education has value disconnected entirely from the degree it leaves you with. The process of learning is a process of growth that cannot be measured by grades or by transcripts. I believe that CEP understands that process on a level I have not previously seen in a major and I am excited at the opportunity to enter a community with such values. Yet it is more than the intrinsic value of education that draws me to the CEP program.

Tue, Feb. 14th, 2006, 07:17 pm

Tepekkiir


The disk paused for a moment and then turned over in the cassette player, again blasting the same fiery songs we had heard for the last six hours. The truck player pointed to it roughly and resolutely exclaimed “turkey” responding to our nods with a satisfied grin. The Turkish flag dangled over the dashboard, and the stained carpet I sat cross legged upon in the sleeper cabin of the truck added to the ambiance.
“Turkey” was the only evident English word the driver spoke. I spoke neither Turkish nor French which the driver grudgingly accepted while continuing to call me “mademoiselle”. I had hoped my years studying Spanish would provide that much needed link, but it was not the case. In desperation my brother pulled out his rusty high school German skills, and though we drove through Germany beyond his recognition of “guten Tag” they fell flat. Regardless of the impasse we had reached I know this; Turkish beer is the best there is, Turkish music is unbeatable, and when it comes to Turkish soccer nothing compares. His name was Ahmed, and his two daughters and wife saw him only every three months as his job was to transport cargo throughout Europe. We relied on our innovation to communicate and when stick figures on the side of a rusty truck taught us all we could know we relied on lessons words couldn’t speak.
My brother and I had spent significant time hitch-hiking in several countries throughout Europe when we met him. The generosity of our hosts was sometimes overwhelming and more than occasionally embarrassing. Ahmed reached new heights and it was a personal struggle not to reject his hospitality. My prideful spirit resisted his continuous benevolence, yet I found there are lessons beyond the scope of self reliance. When hunger overwhelmed us he pulled the semi-truck into a lot and we unloaded expecting to grab the fruit snacks and packages of nuts out of our backpacks. Instead he pulled down the storage bin of his truck revealing a full kitchen, complete with propane stove which he pulled down and insisted I, as the woman, used as a stool.
The meals cannot go without mentioning. Feta cheese was sliced into thick portions and loaded along with tomato slices onto pungent bread. Our next meal consisted of eggs scrambled into a tomato paste he mashed upon his make shift cutting board. Bread was dipped into the self spiced mixture to create a filling and surprisingly delicious fare. As night had obscured all he unscrewed reflectors from the bottom of the truck which revealed a tiny light ideal for the illumination of his tiny kitchen. Every element of his habitat, though it was merely an outdated semi-truck, was perfectly honed and orchestrated for efficiency.
That night I slept in his sleeper cabin while my brother and our host struggled to gain comfort in the rigid front seats. I stayed awake for some time unsettled by the selflessness such a stranger had shown two kids hitch-hiking off of the autobahn. By the time we parted I had begun to deeply question my own programmed view of the world where each human takes care of himself first and foremost. Without intending to gain anything but transportation between the Netherlands and Berlin I had experienced enough to devastate a lifetime of comfortable thought.
We stepped down from his truck just outside the town of Magdeburg and finally retrieving our phrasebook from our backpacks made a feeble attempt at pronouncing “tepekkiir” to which he laughed, waved, and drove away. Through our brief interaction I realized my inadequacy at allowing others in beyond a superficial level. Though I had experienced previously the challenges and rewards of communicating across a language barrier the day I spent with Ahmed gave me a new understanding of the interconnectedness of human beings. Such a small glimpse into his life has lead down a path focused on artfully constructing an existence for myself in harmony with my environment and with the human race.
































Arundhati Roy entered my life during a period of cultural draught. My high school had much to be desired when it came to diversity or varying perspectives. I had attended Seventh Day Adventist private schools since preschool and knew very little outside the scope of the fundamentalist outlook. Seeped in an institution run by white males, prohibiting any unorthodox behavior or thinking such as homosexuality, and raiding students of music and books not approved by the administration I was overdue for my initiation into the real world. Arundhati Roy’s book “The God of Small Things” was a meaningful element in my integration.
The book “The God of Small Things” depicted the childhood of two twins growing up in the south Indian state of Kerala. Though it beautifully describes internal horrors they grow up with I was primarily struck by the beauty in their world and in each individual. Throughout my childhood I was bombarded with images of non Christians as riddled in sin, incapable of the moral and ethical fiber that was afforded only by the grace of God. Although I never believed fully in their orthodoxy I admit I was struck every time I found such clear and irrefutable evidence of merit outside of the context of Christianity. Moreover I was struck by the bitter taint of humanity I viewed within the religion.
What began as a fascinating novel left me reeling and with an intense desire to understand humanity. I began with a goal to break down the mystery behind non-Christian religions and soon owned a copy of the Koran, the Baghdad Gita, several Buddhist texts, and a score of novels relating to religions and spirituality. What I unfailingly found in each book was an accumulation of wisdom. I found, along with small differentiating details and rare particulars with which I disagreed, that each had merit, value, and relevance to my life.
Three years later I am far from finishing my search but have expanded it to encompass more than religion. I believe each human has positive and negative attributes and no polarized vision of the world can see the beauty inherent in every element of an individual. In the book “The God of Small Things” societal bigotry against the “untouchables” prohibited love and tore the lives of the characters apart. In my own life I have seen such intolerance have lasting results.

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